Showing posts with label Sacramental records. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Sacramental records. Show all posts

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Tuesday’s Tip: When did Olive Huot die?

Question mark

On a late summer’s day in 1835, my maternal great-great-great-grandparents Charles Beauvais and Olive Huot married in Ste-Anne-des-Plaines, located a little to the north of Montreal. [1] They had three children: Charles, Pierre (my great-great-grandfather) and Céline, born in 1836, 1838 and 1840, respectively. [2]

The family suffered its first loss when mother Olive died. I don’t know exactly when it happened, but I know it was between 1840 and 1846.

When I first began looking for Olive’s death a few years ago, two events helped set the 1840 to 1846 time frame:

  1. The baptism of Céline (Charles’ daughter by his first wife) on 26 July 1840. [3]
  2. The baptism of Philomène (Charles’ daughter by his second wife) on 28 January 1846. [4]

Since Olive appears to have died in the early 1840s, I wondered if her burial record might be found in St-Jérôme where Céline was baptized. Unfortunately, the record does not appear in that parish’s sacramental registers.

I then turned to the records of Montebello’s church in the seigneurie of Petite-Nation, in present-day Papineau County in southwestern Quebec. I thought perhaps I might find Olive’s burial record in the community where Charles’ daughter by his second wife was baptized in 1846. I did not find it.

That’s where things stood until earlier this month, when I decided to look again at the 1842 census of Canada East. I didn’t think it would be of much use, though, because it’s partially nominal since only heads of households are enumerated by name.

I located Charles on the 1842 census living in the Petite-Nation seigneurie. As Charles Beauvais, farmer, he appears on line 20 of stamped page 1265. [5] His household consisted of the following individuals:

  • 1 Male “30 and not 60”
  • 1 Male “above five and under fourteen years of age”
  • 1 Male “five years of age and under”
  • 1 Female “five years of age and under 5”.

However, one person was absent from the household – an adult woman. I double-checked the columns for females “14 and not 45” and “45 and upwards” to see if I had missed an adult woman, but I hadn’t. Olive’s absence from her husband’s household suggested that she was deceased.

Thanks to a fresh look at the 1842 census I was able to establish a more specific range for my 3x great-grandmother’s death.

I now know that Olive died between 26 July 1840 (when her daughter Céline was baptized) and 1 February 1842 (the official date for that year’s census). [6]

So, my tip to my readers is don’t ignore documents that have seemingly limited information. Use them not only for what’s in them, but also for what’s missing from them.

Sources:

1. Ste-Anne (Ste-Anne-des-Plaines, Quebec), parish register, 1835, p. 28 recto, entry no. M.20, Charles Bouvet [sic] – Olive Huot marriage, 7 September 1835; Ste-Anne-des-Plaines parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 25 April 2008).

2. Ste-Anne (Ste-Anne-des-Plaines, Quebec), parish register, 1836, p. 17 recto, entry no. B.117, Charles Bouvet [sic] baptism, 1 July 1836; Ste-Anne parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 29 March 2008). Also, Ste-Anne (Ste-Anne-des-Plaines, Quebec), parish register, 1838, p. 4 recto, no entry no., Pierre Bouvet [sic] baptism, 24 February 1838; Ste-Anne parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 29 March 2008). Also, St-Jérôme (St-Jérôme, Quebec), parish register, 1840, p. 34 verso, entry no. B.137, Céline Bouvais [sic] baptism, 26 July 1840; St-Jérôme parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 28 February 2008).

3. St-Jérôme (St-Jérôme, Quebec), parish register, 1840, p. 34 verso, entry no. B.137, Céline Bouvais [sic] baptism, 26 July 1840. Although Céline’s mother was not present at her daughter’s baptism (only her godparents were, according to the then custom), if Olive had been deceased, it would have been noted in the baptism record.

4. Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours (Montebello, Quebec), parish register, 1815-1900, p. 104 recto, entry no. B.16 (1846), Philomène Beauvais baptism, 31 January 1846; Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 31 March 2010).

5. "Canada, recensement du Bas-Canada, 1842", index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-11344-9231-72?cc=1834340 : accessed 4 September 2014), entry for Charles Beauvais, Ottawa > Petite-Nation (seigneurie) > image 29 of 40; citing Public Archives, Ottawa, Ontario.1842 census.

6. Dave Obee, Counting Canada: A Genealogical Guide to the Canadian Census (Victoria, BC: Dave Obee, 2012), 65. According to Obee, the 1842 census “was to be completed by February 1, 1842.

Copyright © 2014, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Friday, September 19, 2014

52 Ancestors: #38 Arline Deschatelets and Her Estimated Date of Birth

Amy Johnson Crow at No Story Too Small has issued herself and her readers a challenge for 2014. It’s called “52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks”, and as Amy explains, the challenge is to “have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor”.

For the 38th week of this challenge, I chose Arline Deschatelets (1844/47-1923).

Arline is my maternal great-great-grandmother and is number 29 in my ancestor list.

She was one of the eleven children of Joseph Deschatelets and his wife Angélique Caillé, who married in 1835 in Ste-Anne-des-Plaines, Terrebonne County, Quebec. [1]

I don’t know when or where Arline was born; I haven’t found her baptism record and civil registration didn’t exist in Quebec at this time. Despite my searches, her baptism doesn’t appear in the parish records of Ste-Anne-des-Plaines (where her parents married), in St-Jérôme, Terrebonne County (where her three immediate siblings were baptized), or in Montebello, Papineau County (where her next sibling was baptized). I also checked nearby parishes like Grenville, Montpellier, Chénéville, St-Sixte, St-Emile de Suffolk, Plaissance, Papineauville and Notre-Dame-de-la-Paix, all without success.

Despite this shortcoming, I turned to other records to provide approximate dates of birth for Arline. Here’s what my calculations based on those records look like in a table format:

Table estimating birth year for Arline Deschatelets

I adapted my table above on a similar one I saw a few years ago in Emily Anne Croom’s Unpuzzling Your Past. [2] (I was waiting to get Croom’s book from the library to help me complete my article, which is why Arline didn’t appear in Week 37 like I had originally planned.)

Without Arline’s baptism record to tell me when she was born, the best I can have is a birth range for her. Therefore, based on census, marriage and burial records, Arline was born between 6 April 1844 and 4 April 1847 (using the earliest and latest calculated years in the table).

Sources:

1. Ste-Anne (Ste-Anne-des-Plaines, Quebec), parish register, 1835, p. 3 recto, no entry no., Joseph Pinault [sic] – Angélique Caillé marriage, 19 January 1835; Ste-Anne parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 25 March 2008).

2. Emily Anne Croom, Unpuzzling Your Past, 4th ed. (Cincinnati, Ohio: Betterway Books, 2001), 105.

Copyright © 2014, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Wednesday’s Child: Alma Desgroseilliers (1904-1907)


Little Alma Desgroseilliers was only three years and six months old when she died. [1]
 

Alma Desgroseilliers with her brothers Eugene and Arthur

Alma with her brothers Eugène (left) and Arthur (right), about 1906.

She was the third child and eldest daughter of Albert and Clémentine (Léveillé) Desgroseilliers.

Born on 14 January 1904 in St-Charles, Ontario, Alma was baptised “Alma Fabiana” three days later in St-Thomas Apôtre church in nearby Warren. [2] Actually, I’m not sure if her godparents brought her to Warren (taking a newborn out in winter doesn’t seem prudent), or if Father Nayl travelled to St-Charles to baptise Alma, and then once back in Warren recorded the details in his church’s sacramental register.

In about 1906 or early 1907, Alma’s parents and her elder brothers (Eugène, my maternal grandfather, and Arthur) moved to Cobalt, northeast of St-Charles, near the Ontario-Quebec border. I don’t know what prompted my great-grandfather Albert to relocate his young family there, but perhaps it had something to do with silver being discovered in Cobalt in 1903. [3] Neither his daughter's death registration nor her burial record indicate what kind of work Albert did at this time. (He had been a farmer in St-Charles.)


Alma, who had been ill with bronchitis for one week, died on 6 July 1907 in Cobalt. [4] She was buried there in the cemetery the next day; her father was present. [5]


How sad it must have been for Albert, Clémentine and their sons when they returned to live in St-Charles in the spring of 1908.


Sources:


1. “Ontario, Canada Deaths, 1869-1932”, digital image, Ancestry.ca (www.ancestry.ca : accessed 20 January 2012), entry for Alma Degrossalier [sic], 6 July 1907; citing Archives of Ontario, Registrations of Deaths - 1869-1932; Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario; microfilm series MS935, reel 131.


2. “Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1907”, digital image, Ancestry.ca (www.ancestry.ca : 20 January 2012), entry for Alma Fabi[ana] Desgrosellier [sic] (written as Desgrosellier, indexed as Desgrciellier), 14 January 1904; citing Archives of Ontario, Registrations of Birth and Stillbirths – 1869-1904; Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario; microfilm series MS929, reel 174. Also, St-Thomas Apôtre (Warren, Ontario), parish register, 1901-1967, p. 12 verso, entry no. 6 (1904), Alma Fabiana Desgroseilliers baptism, 17 January 1904; St-Thomas Apôtre parish; digital image, “Canada, Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1747-1967”, Ancestry.ca (www.ancestry.ca : 20 January 2012).


3. Wikipedia contributors, "Cobalt, Ontario", Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Cobalt,_Ontario&oldid=611476989 : accessed 16 September 2014).


4. “Ontario, Canada Deaths, 1869-1932”, digital image, Ancestry.ca (www.ancestry.ca : accessed 20 January 2012), entry for Alma Degrossalier [sic], 6 July 1907.


5. "Ontario, Roman Catholic Church Records, 1760-1923," digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-24489-8758-36?cc=1927566&wc=M6VR-DTP:220997601,220997602,220997603,221004101 : accessed 20 January 2012), Timiskaming > Cobalt > St Hilarion > Baptisms, marriages, burials 1906-1910 > image 26 of 113, entry for Alma DesGroselliers [sic].


Copyright © 2014, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Church Record Sunday: Jeanne Massé’s Unexpected Death


Burial record of Jeanne Massé in 1764 in Detroit
Burial record of Jeanne Massé (1764)

It’s not very often that I find causes of death stated in my ancestors’ burial records, but I recently came across a noteworthy example.

Jeanne Massé and her husband Michel Campeau are my maternal ancestors. Both were baptized in Montreal in 1677 and 1667, respectively. They married there on 7 January 1696 and raised a family of eleven children. Michel died in 1737, while Jeanne survived him by twenty-seven years, dying on 4 September 1764 in Detroit. She was buried there the next day in the parish of Ste-Anne. [1]

Jeanne’s burial record is most interesting, thanks to the officiating priest Bocquet, who provided more than the required amount of details for such a sacramental record. A copy of that record is seen above, while below is my translation:

“The year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred sixty four, the fifth of September was buried in the cemetery of this church, the body of Jeanne Massé, widow of the late [sieur] Michel Campeau, during his lifetime [bourgeois] of this town, residing [in] Saint Jacques road, died yesterday suddenly; [in a] state of infancy, in which she had fallen for more than three years and her age of approximately ninety years, having hide from all the symptoms which would have caused suspicion the approach of her death. The said burial in presence of the [sieurs] Saint Bernard, [son-in-law] of the deceased, Chapoton, Rocour and many other relatives and friends which the principals have signed with us.”

Jeanne, who was 87 years old and not 90, had been afflicted with dementia for more than three years. Despite her condition, or perhaps because of it, she managed to conceal ill health to the point that her death was unexpected to those who knew her.

Source:

1. Ste-Anne (Detroit, Michigan), parish register, 1760-1781, p. 606, no entry no. (1764), Jeanne Massé burial, 5 September 1764; Ste-Anne parish; digital image, “Early U.S. French Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1695-1954”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 26 August 2014).

Copyright © 2014, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Church Record Sunday: Possible Burial Record of Pierre Janvry dit Belair

Burial record of Pierre Vrille Janvril
Burial record of Pierre Vrille (1848)

Some years ago, a correspondent shared with me the burial record of someone who was possibly our common ancestor. It was for a man named Pierre Vrille, who died on 26 December 1848 and who was buried two days later in the parish of St-François-de-Sales in Pointe-Gatineau, now in Gatineau County, Quebec.

The burial record can be seen in “Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967” at Ancestry.ca, but the image is almost unreadable. He appears there as “Pierre Vielle” in the database index, but as “Pierre Vrille” in the record. [1] A more legible image is available at FamilySearch.org, seen above in a cropped version. [2]

This record, written in French and signed by Father J. Ginguet, adds that the burial took place in the parish cemetery and that the witnesses were Jean Marie Lacloche and François Lacloche. No mention is made of a wife for Pierre, however.

The following points suggest that Pierre Vrille is the same man as Pierre Janvry dit Belair, my paternal great-great-great-grandfather:

Vrille pronounced in French sounds like the second syllable in Janvril(le), a variant of Janvry.

• Pierre Vrille was born about 1773, based on his age (“soixante et quinze ans” – 75 years old) at his burial. [3]

• Pierre Janvry dit Belair was born on 2 March 1772. [4]

• Pierre Janvry dit Belair resided in Aylmer in 1843 [5] and in nearby Hull in 1845. [6] Aylmer, Hull, Pointe-Gatineau and neighbouring communities merged in 2002 and became the city of Gatineau. [7]

• Pierre Janvry dit Belair died after 2 September 1845 (when he was present at his son’s marriage) [8], but before 29 September 1851 (when his widow remarried). [9]

• There is no burial record for a Pierre Janvry or Pierre Belair between 1845 and 1851 in the province of Quebec. [10]

Sources:

1. St-François-de-Sales (Pointe-Gatineau, Quebec), parish register, 1847-1857, p. 29 verso, entry no. Sépulture 16 (1848), Pierre Vrille (written as Vrille, indexed as Vielle) burial, 28 December 1848; St-François-de-Sales parish; digital image, “Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 4 March 2009).

2. "Québec, registres paroissiaux catholiques, 1621-1979," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-28004-12486-60?cc=1321742&wc=9RL6-FMH:17434701,17434702,17552101 : accessed 12 August 2014), Pointe-Gatineau > Saint-François-de-Sales-de-Templeton > Index 1847-1876 Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1847-1874 > image 118 of 580, Pierre Vrille burial.

3. St-François-de-Sales, parish register, 1847-1857, p. 29 verso, Pierre Vrille burial, 28 December 1848.

4. Ste-Geneviève (Pierrefonds, Quebec), parish register, 1756-1775, no p. no., no entry no. (1772), Pierre Janvery [sic] baptism, 2 March 1772; Ste-Geneviève parish; digital image, “Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 23 March 2008).

5. St-Paul (Aylmer, Quebec), parish register, 1841-1851, p. 89 verso, entry no. M.19 (1843), Louis Poulin – Esther Jeanvril marriage, 5 September 1843, St-Paul parish; digital image, “Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 1 March 2012). Pierre and his wife Scholastique are residents “de ce Township” (of this township) at their daughter Esther’s marriage in 1843.

6. St-Paul (Aylmer, Quebec), parish register, 1841-1848, p. 250, no entry no. (1845), Paul Jeanvril – Angélique Lalonde marriage, 2 September 1845, Missions d’Aylmer parish; digital image, “Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 1 March 2012). Pierre and Scholastique were “de Hull” (from Hull) at their son Paul’s marriage in 1845.

7. Wikipedia contributors, "Gatineau", Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gatineau&oldid=620823900 : accessed 12 August 2014).

8. St-Paul, parish register, 1841-1848, p. 250, Paul Jeanvril – Angélique Lalonde marriage, 2 September 1845.

9. St-Camillus (Farrellton, Quebec), parish register, 1851-1868, p. 17 verso, entry no. M.7 (1851), Joseph Clemens – Scholastique Michel [sic] marriage, 29 September 1851; St-Camillus parish; digital image, “Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 4 March 2009). Scholastique is described as “widow of Pierre Belair” in her marriage record.

10. “Le LAFRANCE”, database, GénéalogieQuébec (www.genealogiequebec.com : accessed 12 August 2014). A search for a burial record for “Pierre Janvry” (including Janvril and Jeanvril) or “Pierre Belair” between 1845 and 1851 proved negative.

Copyright © 2014, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Friday, July 25, 2014

52 Ancestors: #30 Marie Guérard, baptized "sous condition"

Amy Johnson Crow at No Story Too Small has issued herself and her readers a challenge for 2014. It’s called “52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks”, and as Amy explains, the challenge is to “have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor”.

For the 30th week of this challenge, I chose Marie Guérard (1840-1917).

Marie is my paternal great-great-grandmother and is number 23 in my ancestor list.

According to her baptism record in February 1841, Marie was born in “le mois de décembre dernier” (the month of December last). [1]

She was baptized “sous condition” (on condition) in the mission of St-Alphonsus of Liguori in Chapeau, Pontiac County, Quebec. The phrase “sous condition” in a baptism record means that a child is baptized on the condition that he or she hasn’t already been baptized. This scenario occurs, for example, when a newborn is in danger of not surviving and is “ondoyé” (provisionally baptized) by someone present at the birth, for example the midwife, before the child can receive the sacrament of baptism by a priest. If the child survives, he or she is brought to the parish church to be baptized by the priest, who then adds “sous condition” to the child’s record. [2]

Marie was the daughter of Jean-Baptiste Guérard and Euphrosine Laronde. Her father was originally from eastern Quebec, while her mother was a Métis from Ile aux Allumettes, where Chapeau is located. (I’ve written about Euphrosine’s Métis background in Euphrosine Laronde, My Metis Ancestor.)

The next time Marie appears in sacramental records is at her marriage to Joseph Vanasse on 10 January 1859 in St-Alphonsus church in Chapeau. [3]

Marie and Joseph had 13 children, seven sons and six daughters, including Elizabeth, my ancestor.

Marie died on 15 November 1917 in Chapeau. She was buried there two days later in the parish cemetery. [4] Her son Regis (aka Richard) Vanasse and her son-in-law Olivier Vanasse were present.

Sources:

1. St-Paul (Aylmer, Quebec), parish register, 1841-1851, p. 14 verso, no entry no., Marie Guérard baptism, 4 February 1841; St-Paul parish; digital image, “Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 8 June 2010).

2. Can. 869 §1 states: “If there is doubt as to whether a person was baptised or whether a baptism was conferred validly […] the person is to be baptised conditionally [“sous condition”]. The Code of Canon Law In English translation, The Canon Law Society Trust, London: Collins Liturgical Publications, 1983, 160.

3. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1857-1876, p. 3 recto, entry no. M2, Joseph Venance – Mary Siard [Guerard] marriage, 10 January 1859; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 30 July 2007).

4. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1917, p. 15 verso, entry no. S19, Moïse Girard [sic] burial, 17 November 1917; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 30 July 2007).

Copyright © 2014, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Friday, July 11, 2014

52 Ancestors: #28 Elisabeth Frappier

Amy Johnson Crow at No Story Too Small has issued herself and her readers a challenge for 2014. It’s called “52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks”, and as Amy explains, the challenge is to “have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor”.

For the 28th week of this challenge, I chose Elisabeth Frappier (ca 1832-1909).

Elisabeth is my paternal great-great-grandmother and is number 21 in my ancestor list.

Her date and location of birth are unknown. She was baptised on 1 February 1836 as "Nancy Frappier", daughter of Michel Frappier and Lizette Neveu. [1]

Elisabeth was 4 years old in 1836, which means she was born about 1832. Her baptism took place during an expedition to Fort Coulonge and nearby communities by a missionary priest surnamed Brunet. This wilderness area didn't have a church or even a chapel where ecclesiastical records could be kept. Elisabeth’s baptism record (including those of the other baptisms that took place during this mission) was accordingly sent to Notre-Dame parish in Ottawa.

If you examine Notre-Dame's "index des baptêmes" (index of baptisms) for this time frame, you might conclude that Elisabeth's baptism took place in Ottawa. However, a careful reading of her baptism record reveals that it took place in or near Fort Coulonge, Lower Canada (now the province of Quebec) during the late winter of 1836. Fort Coulonge, located a little to the northeast of Ottawa, was a Hudson's Bay Company trading post from 1827 to 1853.

In April 1852, Elisabeth, as “Anne Isabelle Frappier”, married Olivier Vanasse. [2] I wrote about him last week here. The couple had six children: Michael (1853-1933), Julia (1856-1895), Henriette (1856-1883), John (1858-1931), Elizabeth (1860-1953) and Olivier (1863-1944), my great-grandfather.

Elisabeth died on 9 July 1900 in Chichester, Pontiac County, Quebec. In her burial record, she is referred to as “Nancie Frappier” [3], but on her tombstone she is “Elizabeth Vanasse”. [4]

Sources:

1. Notre-Dame (Ottawa, Ontario), parish register, 1825-1836, no p. no., entry no. B3 (1836), Nancy Frappier baptism, 1 February 1836; Basilique Notre-Dame parish; digital image, “Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 28 May 2011).

2. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1846-1856, p. 152 verso, no entry no. (1852), Oliver Vinace – Anne Isabelle Frappier [sic] marriage, 20 April 1852; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 1 March 2011).

3. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1909, no p. no., entry no. S22, Nancie Frappier burial, 11 July 1909; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 27 June 2014).

4. St. Alphonse de Ligouri RC Cemetery, digital images, The Canadian Gravemarker Gallery (http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cangmg/quebec/pontiac/allumett/stalplig/index.htm : accessed 10 July 2014), photograph, grave marker of Elizabeth Vanasse, Chapeau, Quebec.

Copyright © 2014, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Monday, April 07, 2014

Mystery Monday: The Death in 1900 – or Not – of Mary Gertrude Vanasse

In the summer of 1891, a little girl was born to John and Dinasse (Ranger) Vanasse in Chapeau, Pontiac County, Quebec. She was the couple’s first of seven children; three sons and three more daughters were born between 1891 and 1912. She was also a first cousin of my paternal grandmother Julie (Vanasse) Belair.

At her baptism two days later, on 23 August 1891 in Chapeau’s church, she received the names Mary Gertrude. Her godparents were her maternal uncle Evangéliste Ranger and her paternal grandmother Elizabeth Frappier. They could not sign their names in the parish register, unlike the father, who wrote his name in a clear and legible hand. [1]

John and Dinasse suffered a tragedy on 11 April 1900 when one of their children died. According to St-Alphonse’s sacramental register, the child who died was “Mary Gertrude Vanasse”. The burial record adds that she was 8 years old and the daughter of John Vanasse and Dinna [sic] Ranger. (“Dinna” is a variation of Dinasse.) [2]

Mary Gertrude Vanasse burial record
Burial record of Mary Gertrude Vanasse (cropped image) [3]

Based on this information, there’s no reason to doubt who died that April day – or is there?

I believe there is room for doubt, especially because a marriage record exists for Mary Gertrude. On 8 August 1911, Mary Gertrude, “daughter under age of John Venasse [sic] and Dinasse Ranger” married Hector Marchildon in Chapeau’s St-Alphonse church. [4]

The daughter who married was under age, according to her marriage record. Since matrimonial majority was 21 years at this time in the province of Quebec, Mary Gertrude would have been born after 8 August 1890. [5] All of John and Dinasse’s daughters were born after this date, but only one of them was named Mary Gertrude, the eldest. The other daughters were Anna (b. 1897), Mabel (b. 1899) and Clara (b. 1907). I don’t think it’s a case of mistaken identity, say, for example Anna who married instead of Gertrude. Even though Anna was old enough to marry at 14 years old, it’s not her, since she married for the first time in July 1917. [6] As for Mabel and Clara, they were only 12 and 3 ½ years old, respectively.

So, if Mary Gertrude didn’t die in 1900, who did?

I have a theory that the child who died in 1900 was Mary Gertrude’s younger brother Michael John, who was born on 10 December 1895. [7]

Although I haven’t found a burial record for him in St-Alphonse’s registers, at least not one that explicitly states his name, it seems more likely that it was Michael John and not Mary Gertrude who died on 11 April 1900. I've located the death or burial dates for the other siblings (Isaac, Anna and Mabel) who were born before 1900, so it isn't one of them. Also, Michael John, who would have been 5 ½ years old, does not appear in his parents’ household on the 1901 census [8], suggesting he is not alive.

The fact that Michael John wasn’t enumerated with his parents on the 1901 census schedule doesn’t necessarily mean that he’s the child who died in 1900, but the fact that his sister Mary Gertrude married in 1911 means that she couldn’t be the one who died in 1900 and whose name appears in that burial record.

It's difficult to image that St-Alphonse's parish priest would get a child's name, age and gender wrong in its burial record, but it seems to be the case in this situation.


Sources:

1. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1890-1893, p. 57 (stamped), entry no. B.50 (1891), Mary Gertrude Vanasse baptism, 23 August 1891; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 16 July 2010).

2. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1900, p. 10 recto, entry no. S.17, Mary Gertrude Vanasse burial, 12 April 1900; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 17 July 2010).

3. St-Alphonse, parish register, 1900, p. 10 recto, Mary Gertrude Vanasse burial, 12 April 1900.

4. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1911, p. 13 recto, entry no. M.10, Hector Marchildon – Mary Gertrude Venasse [sic] marriage, 8 August 1911; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 17 July 2010).

5. Hélène Lamarche and Guy Desjardins, “Majorité matrimoniale et majorité civile”, Mémoires de la Société généalogique canadienne-française, 56 (printemps 2005): 31; DVD edition (Montreal, QC: SGCF, 2013). The “Code civil du Bas-Canada 1866 (art. 115)” fixed the age of majority, that is, the legal age at which parental consent was no longer required for marriage, at 21 for boys and girls.

6. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1917, p. 11 verso, entry no. M.13, Adolphe Chassé – Anna Vanasse marriage, 28 July 1917; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 17 July 2010). Anna is described as “daughter under age” of her parents, which indicates a first marriage. Had she been a widow and married subsequently to a previous marriage, custom dictates that the name of her late husband is stated in the record instead of the names of her parents.

7. St-Alphonse (Chapeau, Quebec), parish register, 1895, p. 26 recto, entry no. B.86, Michael John Vanasse baptism, 10 December 1895; St-Alphonse parish; digital image, “Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967”, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 16 July 2010).

8. 1901 census of Canada, Chichester, Pontiac, Quebec, population schedule, sub-district I-1, p. 6, dwelling 50, family 50, John Venance [sic] household; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 1 May 2011). Only four children are listed in this family: Gerty (10), Isaac (7), Annie (4) and Mabel (2).

Copyright © 2014, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Friday, January 17, 2014

52 Ancestors: #3 Eugène Desgroseilliers and His Baptism Record

Amy Johnson Crow at No Story Too Small has issued herself and her readers a challenge for 2014. It’s called “52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks”, and as Amy explains, the challenge is to “have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor”.

For the 3rd week of this challenge, I’m focusing on my maternal grandfather Eugène Desgroseilliers and his baptism record. [1]

Background info:

Eugène was the eldest child of Albert and Clémentine (Léveillé) Desgroseilliers. He was born on 30 August 1900 in the rural community of St-Charles, Sudbury District, Ontario. My grandfather’s baptism record states that his parents were domiciled at that time in Jennings, which I believe is a little to the southwest of St-Charles. Although a chapel was established in St-Charles, it burned in May 1900. [2] A new chapel wasn’t built until 1903, so baptisms, marriages and burials took place locally, but were recorded by priests from nearby churches, which in my grandfather’s case happened to be the parish of St-Jean-Baptiste in Verner. [3]

Eugène’s baptism record, shown in two parts:


Eugene Desgroseilliers baptism record
Left side of sacramental register


Eugene Desgroseilliers baptism record
Right side of sacramental register

The text reads in French and Latin:

94 / Emmanuel Eugène / Desgroseilliers / 30 / Augusti / Albert Desgroseilliers et Clémentine Leveillé / Jennings / 11a Septembris / Chs Langlois ptre / Ovide Desgroseilliers et Amanda Leveillé

The English translation of the text with comments in square brackets:

[entry no.] 94 / [baptism name] Emmanuel / [surname] Desgroseilliers / [date of birth] 30 / [month of birth] August / [parents’ names] Albert Desgroseilliers [and] Clémentine Leveillé / [parents’ place of residence] Jennings / [date of baptism] 11 / [month of baptism] September / [officiating priest] Chs Langlois [priest] / [godparents] Ovide Desgroseilliers [and] Amanda Leveillé

Sources:

1. St-Jean-Baptiste (Verner, Ontario), parish register, 1895-1910, p. 29, entry no. 94 (1900), Emmanuel Eugene Desgroseilliers baptism, 11 September 1900; St-Jean-Baptiste parish; digital image, “Ontario, Roman Catholic Church Records, 1760-1923”, FamilySearch.org (https://familysearch.org/ : accessed 6 January 2014). This database is search-only; to reach Eugène’s baptism record, follow this path from the homepage at FamilySearch.org: Search > Canada > Historical Record Collections > Ontario, Roman Catholic Church Records, 1760-1923 > Nipissing > Verner > St John the Baptist > Baptisms 1895-1910 > Image 45 of 108.

2. Lionel Séguin, Historique de la paroisse Saint-Charles (Saint-Charles, Ont., 1945: 42); digital images, Our Roots (http://www.ourroots.ca/ : accessed 18 June 2013).

3. Séguin, Historique de la paroisse Saint-Charles, 43.

Copyright © 2014, Yvonne Demoskoff.

Thursday, September 13, 2012

Family History Through the Alphabet – R is for…

R is for ... religious records.

Religious records are an important source of information to me as a genealogist. With these records, I can trace principal moments in the lives of my ancestors like their baptisms, marriages and burials. Other sacramental records (for example, First Communion and Confirmation) and non-sacramental records (like Profession of Faith) add another, wonderful dimension to my research and help me paint more complete portraits of the members of my family, relatives and ancestors.

Some of my treasured religious records include my grandmother’s burial record, my father’s certificate of religious instruction, my sister’s baptism record, my brother’s Confirmation record, my marriage certificate, and my son’s First Communion record. 

Maurice Belair's certificate of religious instruction, 1939.

Copyright © 2012, Yvonne Demoskoff.